Memory check incorrect


#1

I’ve run a search on memory etc but couldn’t find anything useful, so I’m hoping that someone can help me out with the following:

I’m running Nagios 1.3 on a SUSE Linux 10 box, which is a VMware virtual machine (not sure if this matters). I’ve got Nagios up and running, and have installed the NSCLIENT agent on a W2K3 test server (also a VMware bo:evil:.

Nagios reports disk usage correctly, however the memory feedback is strange - the test server has 1GB of RAM, yet Nagios is reporting 2472.65MB. This is consistent, but is clearly wrong and has no relationship to the VMware host either, which has 32GB of RAM! :cry:

Any ideas anyone?

Thanks,

RT


#2

looks lik you could need some different plugins for VMware… not sure haven’t tried this.

vmware.com/community/thread. … 5&tstart=0

Luca


#3

Thanks Luca - monitoring the VMware hosts was the next step :slight_smile:

I think the discrepancy could be due to the NSCLIENT reporting memuse=‘physical’+swapfile …? Seems to be the case on my servers. I guess using SNMP will be the best way of getting the physical only memory. Time to get that working I guess!

Thanks for your help once again.

All the best,

RT


#4

nsclient takes what you tell it to use possibly even memory+swap :slight_smile: i’m not sure what the MEMORY value itself is…

using COUNTERS gave me no problems.

use the perfromance snap in to see which values you need and fetch them through nsclient, if the values aren’t the same there’s a major problem… :slight_smile:

Luca


#5

One check_mem plugin I had used was actually written incorrectly, saying that I was using way more memory than I really was. It was annoying as crap, telling me I had 10% of the memory I actually had. Essentially, it was saying I had 7% memory available, when I actually had 70%. Something wrong with the math in the plugin. I didn’t bother checking it; I just used another one.


#6

from the nsclient FAQ:

The MEMSTAT feature return the amount of logical memory available for Windows, which means the physical (RAM) plus the swap disk part.

Luca


#7

Wow, didn’t read that post correctly. Missed that whole bit about NSClient. Sorry; haven’t had anything to eat yet today.